Sunday, 21st July 2019
Political News
Sunday, 20 January 2013 05:29
Published in Sports
DETROIT, Jan. 20 (UPI) -- A roster of major U.S. sports publications and retailers were sued by the photographer who snapped a widely used photo of Michigan football star Desmond Howard.

Brian Masck captured the image of Howard striking a "Heisman Trophy" pose during the 1991 Michigan-Ohio State game.

Masck, a freelance photographer, accused companies including Sports Illustrated, Amazon, Walmart and Getty Images with failing to credit him and cheating him out of the money and notoriety he deserved.

"These various intellectual property pirates who are defendants in this case have taken a business crowbar to that byline and have pried Brian Masck's name away from his iconic photograph," said the 63-page suit filed in Detroit federal court. "They have separated him from his work."

The Detroit News said Sunday Masck only received the copyright to the photo in 2011 and made some digital alterations to small details in the image in order to identify publications and products he contends are not authorized to use it.
Thursday, 07 February 2013 07:13
Published in Latest
CLARKSVILLE, Tenn., Feb. 7 (UPI) -- A Tennessee man who quit his job after receiving a W-2 tax form stamped with the number 666 said he was trying to save his soul.

Walter Slonopas, 52, resigned as a maintenance worker at Contech Casting LLC in Clarksville, Tenn., last week because accepting the form stamped with 666 -- believed by some to be the "number of the beast" associated with the apocalypse -- would be a one-way ticket to hell, The Tennessean, a newspaper in Nashville, reported Thursday.

"If you accept that number, you sell your soul to the devil," he said.

Slonopas said he was initially given the number 666 to clock in when he was hired in April 2011 but his complaints led to it being changed to 668. He told the newspaper he resigned after the number reverted to 666 when the company changed time clock systems three months later but he returned to work a few days later when the company apologized.

Bob LaCourciere, vice president of sales and marketing for the Revstone Corp., which owns Contech Casting, said he was shocked the mistake was repeated with a stamp on Slonopas' form.

"I am completely at a loss for words," he said.

LaCourciere said Slonopas will be issued a replacement form and he hopes the worker can be convinced to return to the company.

However, Slonopas said he will not return to Contech.

"God is worth more than money," he told The Tennessean.
Sunday, 20 January 2013 05:29
Published in Sports
DETROIT, Jan. 20 (UPI) -- A roster of major U.S. sports publications and retailers were sued by the photographer who snapped a widely used photo of Michigan football star Desmond Howard.

Brian Masck captured the image of Howard striking a "Heisman Trophy" pose during the 1991 Michigan-Ohio State game.

Masck, a freelance photographer, accused companies including Sports Illustrated, Amazon, Walmart and Getty Images with failing to credit him and cheating him out of the money and notoriety he deserved.

"These various intellectual property pirates who are defendants in this case have taken a business crowbar to that byline and have pried Brian Masck's name away from his iconic photograph," said the 63-page suit filed in Detroit federal court. "They have separated him from his work."

The Detroit News said Sunday Masck only received the copyright to the photo in 2011 and made some digital alterations to small details in the image in order to identify publications and products he contends are not authorized to use it.
Thursday, 07 February 2013 07:13
Published in Latest
CLARKSVILLE, Tenn., Feb. 7 (UPI) -- A Tennessee man who quit his job after receiving a W-2 tax form stamped with the number 666 said he was trying to save his soul.

Walter Slonopas, 52, resigned as a maintenance worker at Contech Casting LLC in Clarksville, Tenn., last week because accepting the form stamped with 666 -- believed by some to be the "number of the beast" associated with the apocalypse -- would be a one-way ticket to hell, The Tennessean, a newspaper in Nashville, reported Thursday.

"If you accept that number, you sell your soul to the devil," he said.

Slonopas said he was initially given the number 666 to clock in when he was hired in April 2011 but his complaints led to it being changed to 668. He told the newspaper he resigned after the number reverted to 666 when the company changed time clock systems three months later but he returned to work a few days later when the company apologized.

Bob LaCourciere, vice president of sales and marketing for the Revstone Corp., which owns Contech Casting, said he was shocked the mistake was repeated with a stamp on Slonopas' form.

"I am completely at a loss for words," he said.

LaCourciere said Slonopas will be issued a replacement form and he hopes the worker can be convinced to return to the company.

However, Slonopas said he will not return to Contech.

"God is worth more than money," he told The Tennessean.
Sunday, 20 January 2013 05:29
Published in Sports
DETROIT, Jan. 20 (UPI) -- A roster of major U.S. sports publications and retailers were sued by the photographer who snapped a widely used photo of Michigan football star Desmond Howard.

Brian Masck captured the image of Howard striking a "Heisman Trophy" pose during the 1991 Michigan-Ohio State game.

Masck, a freelance photographer, accused companies including Sports Illustrated, Amazon, Walmart and Getty Images with failing to credit him and cheating him out of the money and notoriety he deserved.

"These various intellectual property pirates who are defendants in this case have taken a business crowbar to that byline and have pried Brian Masck's name away from his iconic photograph," said the 63-page suit filed in Detroit federal court. "They have separated him from his work."

The Detroit News said Sunday Masck only received the copyright to the photo in 2011 and made some digital alterations to small details in the image in order to identify publications and products he contends are not authorized to use it.
Thursday, 07 February 2013 07:13
Published in Latest
CLARKSVILLE, Tenn., Feb. 7 (UPI) -- A Tennessee man who quit his job after receiving a W-2 tax form stamped with the number 666 said he was trying to save his soul.

Walter Slonopas, 52, resigned as a maintenance worker at Contech Casting LLC in Clarksville, Tenn., last week because accepting the form stamped with 666 -- believed by some to be the "number of the beast" associated with the apocalypse -- would be a one-way ticket to hell, The Tennessean, a newspaper in Nashville, reported Thursday.

"If you accept that number, you sell your soul to the devil," he said.

Slonopas said he was initially given the number 666 to clock in when he was hired in April 2011 but his complaints led to it being changed to 668. He told the newspaper he resigned after the number reverted to 666 when the company changed time clock systems three months later but he returned to work a few days later when the company apologized.

Bob LaCourciere, vice president of sales and marketing for the Revstone Corp., which owns Contech Casting, said he was shocked the mistake was repeated with a stamp on Slonopas' form.

"I am completely at a loss for words," he said.

LaCourciere said Slonopas will be issued a replacement form and he hopes the worker can be convinced to return to the company.

However, Slonopas said he will not return to Contech.

"God is worth more than money," he told The Tennessean.
Sunday, 20 January 2013 05:29
Published in Sports
DETROIT, Jan. 20 (UPI) -- A roster of major U.S. sports publications and retailers were sued by the photographer who snapped a widely used photo of Michigan football star Desmond Howard.

Brian Masck captured the image of Howard striking a "Heisman Trophy" pose during the 1991 Michigan-Ohio State game.

Masck, a freelance photographer, accused companies including Sports Illustrated, Amazon, Walmart and Getty Images with failing to credit him and cheating him out of the money and notoriety he deserved.

"These various intellectual property pirates who are defendants in this case have taken a business crowbar to that byline and have pried Brian Masck's name away from his iconic photograph," said the 63-page suit filed in Detroit federal court. "They have separated him from his work."

The Detroit News said Sunday Masck only received the copyright to the photo in 2011 and made some digital alterations to small details in the image in order to identify publications and products he contends are not authorized to use it.
Thursday, 07 February 2013 07:13
Published in Latest
CLARKSVILLE, Tenn., Feb. 7 (UPI) -- A Tennessee man who quit his job after receiving a W-2 tax form stamped with the number 666 said he was trying to save his soul.

Walter Slonopas, 52, resigned as a maintenance worker at Contech Casting LLC in Clarksville, Tenn., last week because accepting the form stamped with 666 -- believed by some to be the "number of the beast" associated with the apocalypse -- would be a one-way ticket to hell, The Tennessean, a newspaper in Nashville, reported Thursday.

"If you accept that number, you sell your soul to the devil," he said.

Slonopas said he was initially given the number 666 to clock in when he was hired in April 2011 but his complaints led to it being changed to 668. He told the newspaper he resigned after the number reverted to 666 when the company changed time clock systems three months later but he returned to work a few days later when the company apologized.

Bob LaCourciere, vice president of sales and marketing for the Revstone Corp., which owns Contech Casting, said he was shocked the mistake was repeated with a stamp on Slonopas' form.

"I am completely at a loss for words," he said.

LaCourciere said Slonopas will be issued a replacement form and he hopes the worker can be convinced to return to the company.

However, Slonopas said he will not return to Contech.

"God is worth more than money," he told The Tennessean.
Saturday, 02 February 2013 14:22
Published in Entertainment
LOS ANGELES, Feb. 2 (UPI) -- Justin Bieber's friend Lil Za got pulled over by Los Angeles police twice in under 36 hours while driving the Canadian pop singer's Ferrari, TMZ reports.

The celebrity news website reported a witness saw Lil Za drop off a female passenger outside a downtown Los Angeles Chipotle about noon Saturday, make an U-turn and promptly get pulled over. The unidentified witness said Bieber's buddy was given a ticket and sent on his way.

TMZ said Bieber also was not in his sports car when Lil Za was stopped in West Hollywood about 1:30 a.m. Friday and cited for driving without a license.

Bieber's Ferrari just seems to draw police. Another of Bieber's friends, Lil Twist, was driving it Jan. 1 and got pulled over for allegedly speeding. A photographer was fatally struck by another car after he stopped to shoot some pictures of the traffic stop.
Sunday, 20 January 2013 05:29
Published in Sports
DETROIT, Jan. 20 (UPI) -- A roster of major U.S. sports publications and retailers were sued by the photographer who snapped a widely used photo of Michigan football star Desmond Howard.

Brian Masck captured the image of Howard striking a "Heisman Trophy" pose during the 1991 Michigan-Ohio State game.

Masck, a freelance photographer, accused companies including Sports Illustrated, Amazon, Walmart and Getty Images with failing to credit him and cheating him out of the money and notoriety he deserved.

"These various intellectual property pirates who are defendants in this case have taken a business crowbar to that byline and have pried Brian Masck's name away from his iconic photograph," said the 63-page suit filed in Detroit federal court. "They have separated him from his work."

The Detroit News said Sunday Masck only received the copyright to the photo in 2011 and made some digital alterations to small details in the image in order to identify publications and products he contends are not authorized to use it.


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